Thursday, March 29, 2012

POW Bowe Bergdahl Vigil March 30th

Thanks to 15 year old John Weber Bowe Bergdahl's plight as a POW in Afghanistan has been brought to the attention of the American people and congress.  He set out to collect 30,000 signatures prior to March 30th, 2012 and as of March 29th, 53,500 signatures had been turned in with more coming at the vigil at the VFW in Wausau, WI Friday night.  Randlin Homes has been privileged to help in this wonderful effort and will be looking forward to working with Johnny in the years to come to help veterans in Wisconsin. 

Tuesday, January 31, 2012

Harley Raffle and Cash Drawing Fundraiser Canceled

We regret that there has not been enough interest in the Harley Davidson or cash raffle and Valentines Dinner that we had planned at the VFW.  The VFW was not able to sell even one ticket and Doc's Harley only sold one. With the many layoffs in the area it is a tough time for many.

If you still want to help Randlin Homes please shop at our stores at 1006 N. 6th St and 1st Ave and Bridge Street where you will find tons of awesome things. Check out our new video!! And we are still in the process. Watch for the grand re-opening where you can get great discounts, gift certificates and be involved in raffles and giveaways.

video
God bless you all for helping our homeless veterans and many others who are in need of your help!

Wednesday, January 18, 2012

Thanks Brigette for the Randlin Offers More than Just Shelter Story!

http://www.wsaw.com/home/headlines/Randlin_Homes_Offer_More_Than_Just_Shelter__136779093.html
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While snow covers the ground and the temperatures are expected get colder this weekend, some people struggle to keep warm.
That's especially true if a car or an area under a bridge is what you call home.
Some people in Wausau are not privileged to live in a warm house.
Many circumstances can cause someone to be homeless. The president at Randlin Homes in Wausau said she does not care what their situation is. That is because her door is always open.
"Some people would just rather shove these people to the side and say oh they choose to be homeless. I'm sorry, I don't agree with that," said Linda Schlitz.
Randlin Homes take in men and women. They provide them with food, clothes, jobs and educational programs.
The rooms at Randlin are filling up because of the growing number of layoffs and the rocky economy.
The group has more than 45 beds and six homes.
In 2010, Marathon County was one of the largest counties with a growth in homeless families, accordning to the Wisconsin Department of Commerce's 201 Annual Report.
For ways to donate or volunteer visit www.randlinhomes.org.

CHANNEL 7 COVThanks Al for Covering our Hopes for Better Sales

http://www.wsaw.com/home/headlines/Randlin_Homes_Hopes_For_Better_2012_In_Thrift_Store_Sales__137505803.html
Area homeless shelter is facing tough times, and may have to close one of its homes if things don’t get better.
Randlin Homes is facing tough times, and the organization's leaders say the community can help solve the problem. Randlin runs six homes that provide shelter for veterans, as well as anyone in need.
The nonprofit organization is funded through thrift stores, which sell gently used items, donated by the community. Those stores are run by those who are benefiting from Randlin homes the most..
Randlin Director of Marketing, Larry Payne says, “Our workers are primarily our residence and its part of training program. Many of our residence come to us with very little or experience, or maybe they have been out of work for maybe 10 years 20 years."
Leaders say that after earning $28,000 less than expected last year, the group may have to close the doors to one of its six homes.
It’s a move that would affect those who rely on the facilities to survive.
Randlin homes provide shelter to 46 people, 60 percent of which are veterans. Shelter leaders say they'll never turn down a war veteran in need, even if they have to make arrangements for more space
They say closing one home would affect their entire process since each home provides certain services designed to provide a better life for residents.
If you would like to donate furniture or money, or even volunteer, Randlin homes has two thrift store locations in Wausau. One is on 6th Street, the other on Bridge Street.

Randlin Homes Hopes for Better Sales in 2012- THANKS JEFF AND DAILY HERALD!

http://www.wsaw.com/home/headlines/Randlin_Homes_Hopes_For_Better_2012_In_Thrift_Store_Sales__137505803.htm
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Volunteer Brenda Brzezinski sweeps dust off consignment items Monday at Randlin Bridges of Hope Store on the corner of Bridge Street and North First Avenue in Wausau. Low 2011 sales for Randlin Homes might force the nonprofit to close one of its homeless shelters. / Xai Kha/Wausau Daily Herald

TO DONATE Randlin will pick up and deliver furniture in the community. To donate money, send checks to PO Box 1488, Wausau, WI 54402 or donate online with PayPal or credit card.

For more information, call Larry Payne at 715-869-2756 or visit
www.randlinhomes.org.
Randlin Homes might be forced to close one of its homeless shelters after sales dropped $38,000 in 2011 compared to 2010 at its two Wausau thrift stores.
The nonprofit Randlin Homes was founded in 2001 in Wausau to provide shelter for homeless veterans and now owns six homes with a total of 46 beds. The organization also helps link its residents who abuse alcohol and drugs to counselors, and teaches residents skills so they can hold jobs.
Randlin relies on sales from its thrift stores for the majority of its income and already struggles to pay its loans and utility bills, said Linda Larson Schlitz, president of Randlin Homes. Schlitz and Randlin leaders don't know why people are not shopping at the thrift stores and hope people think of the stores as a shopping destination.
If customers don't return, Randlin might be forced to close or sell one of its homes, Schlitz said. Randlin officials are trying to find ways to attract more shoppers to their stores before taking drastic, cost-saving measures, she said.
"(The thrift stores) are our main thing we do," Schlitz said. "It's how we make our living. Thirty-eight thousand dollars, that's a lot of money we don't have."
Randlin's secondhand resale store, Gallery of Hope and Thrift Store at 1006 N. Sixth St., sells antiques, collectibles, furniture and books. Randlin's second store, Randlin Bridges of Hope Store at the intersection of Bridge Street and First Avenue, sells upscale furniture, artwork and household items.
The stores are run predominately by Randlin residents themselves and a few volunteers, none of whom are paid.
About nine months ago, Desert Storm Navy veteran Brian Kitzman, 39, suffered through family problems while living in Stevens Point. Kitzman said he turned to alcohol to cope, was arrested for drunken driving and spent a couple of months in jail. Kitzman joined Randlin after a month-long stint in an alcohol abuse rehabilitation center and turned his life around.
Kitzman now drives a truck for Randlin's moving company and is working with another Randlin resident to open a transitional living facility for other residents who are battling job loss and homelessness.
"I'd probably be staggering around doing the same thing I did previously," Kitzman said, referring to what he might be doing without help from Randlin.
Scott Berger, Marathon County's veterans service officer, said he often refers homeless veterans to Randlin and would be disappointed if Randlin would have less space to house the homeless. The alternative to Randlin is The Salvation Army shelter, but that facility is often full, and the nearest Wisconsin Department of Veterans Affairs shelters are in King, Chippewa Falls and Fort McCoy, Berger said.
"Many times, people I come across that are homeless are reluctant to go away, especially if they are from this community," Berger said.
To avoid closing the doors to one of the homes, Randlin needs shoppers or cash donations, Schlitz said.
"Why go and buy somewhere else when you can buy from a nonprofit?" Schlitz said.

Wausau Daily Herald- Great Articles! Thanks

http://www.wausaudailyherald.com/article/20120116/WDH0101/120116137/Randlin-Homes-could-close-home-after-thrift-stores-lose-38-000
Randlin Homes might be forced to close one of its homeless shelters after sales dropped $38,000 in 2011 compared to 2010 at its two Wausau thrift stores, according to Randlin officials.
The non-profit Randlin Homes provides shelter for homeless veterans and owns six homes with a total of 46 beds. The organization links its residents with alcohol and substance abuse issues to counselors and teaches residents skills so they can hold jobs.

Randlin relies on sales from its thrift stores for the majority of its income, said Linda Larson Schlitz, president of Randlin Homes.

Schlitz and Randlin leaders don’t know why people are not shopping at the thrift stores and hope that people think of the stores as a shopping destination. Randlin’s second-hand resale store, Gallery of Hope and Thrift Store at 1006 N. Sixth St., sells antiques, collectibles, furniture, and books. Randlin’s second store, Randlin Bridges of Hope Store at the intersection of Bridge Street and First Avenue, sells upscale furniture, artwork and household items.

“(The thrift stores) are our main thing we do,” Schlitz said. “It’s how we make our living. Thirty-eight thousand dollars, that’s a lot of money we don’t have.”

Read the complete story in Tuesday’s edition of the Wausau Daily Herald.

Sunday, January 1, 2012

New Sober House Opens This Week

Randlin Homes is pleased to support the opening of the Oxford House Parkside Sober Living Home for Veterans that is now taking applications for admission. The home is being started by Randlin Graduates Dan Schultz and Brian Kitzman who are also the primary workers that operate the Randlin Homes Moving Company.

The Home is located near Marathon Park and will provide up to 9 men a safe sober living environment where they will be able to focus on their recovery to support ongoing self sufficiency. The Oxford Model requires a democratic process of operations where peers ensure that the home is being financially responsible and is ensuring absolute sobriety of all their residents.

The Home will be under the umbrella of Oxford House International which is a non-profit 501(c )(3) so donations to the efforts will be tax deductible. For more information or to apply for admission you can contact Dan Schultz 715-302-4852.